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How To Brew

There will be a multitude of ways out there that you can find how to brew Chinese tea and each one will be the perfect way for someone. The best way to find out how you like your tea is to start off with the basics.

First you need to know is ratio of tea to water. A good place to start is 5g to 200ml. Then the only place to go is toward Gong Fu. Gong Fu style typically uses smaller teapots, and more tea. The standard ratio is 10g for every 100ml, but some might not want to jump right into that style.

The second thing you need to know is that basically every type of tea is brewed differently, but don't get overwhelmed, it'll get easier to remember with time. First off there's the water temperature, which are only mostly accurate. 

The third thing you need to know is time. Typically you would do what is called a flashbrew. That is when you infuse the leaves for 10+ seconds, depending on the tea and how many sessions in you are. A good example may be 10, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 45, 60, 90 seconds. You typically always go up or stay the same in time, as well as with temperature. 

One side note would be fermented, aged or rolled teas such as Liu Bao, Puer, Hei Cha or Tieguanyin. With these unique teas, you would first do a rinse, where you pour water most of the way up and empty it immediately. This is also called "tea for your enemies". This is because aged teas typically sit out while they age and the rinse is to get the dust and everything else that may have gotten on it and this was given to their enemies. 

Another thing to know is to heat up your teapot. pour some hot water in your teapot and let it sit in there to warm the walls and create some steam once dumped. dump this water out and drop your leaves in, this will start to open up your tea leaves while also heating them at the right temperature so that your teapot doesn't take away a little. A little trick you can do, is if you need to do a rinse, dump this water into a pitcher and then use it for your rinse to eliminate wasting water. 

And the last thing to know would be the vessel. Different teas work better with different teapots. There are so many different types, including: Glass, porcelain, ceramic, thin & thick walled clay(mostly yixing), cast iron, stone, and silver, to name a few.

So as a start here are an example of how to brew each type of tea:

Fresh White Tea - 175°F - Glass or porcelain teapots or thin walled gaiwan
Brew time example: 10, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 45

Aged White Tea - 195°F - Thick walled yixing clay teapots
Quickly rinse, brew time example: 15, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 45

Green Tea - 195°F - Glass or porcelain thin walled gaiwan or teapots
Brew time example: 10, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 45

Anxi Oolong - 208°F - Thin walled yixing or porcelain teapots
Quickly rinse, brew time example: 15, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 45

Wuyi Oolong - 208°F - Wide thick walled yixing clay teapots
Brew time example: 15, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45

Black Tea - 208°F - Thick walled yixing clay teapots or thick walled gaiwans
Brew time example: 15, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45

Liu Bao/Shu Puer/Hei-Cha - 208°F - Thick yixing clay teapots
Quickly rinse, brew time example: 20, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 45, 60

Sheng Puer - 208°F - Thin walled yixing clay teapots
Quickly rinse, brew time example: 20, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 45, 60